How was Training?

more

“Good overview then more detailed understanding of PEAF” - Consultant, KMF Consulting, Australia, Aug 2010

Recommend PEAF?

more

“Yes - Its easy to access” - Manager, CIS, University of Ballarat, Australia, Jan 2015






There is a famous quote…

"Good decisions come from experience. Experience comes from making bad decisions."

- Mark Twain

The basic idea behind this quote is excellent, and certainly very eloquent. However, it also hides the cultural problems that tend to make its use extremely limited in practice.

Perhaps a more Pragmatic quote would be…

"Good decisions come from experience. Experience comes from making bad decisions, accepting that they were bad decisions, and modifying your future decisions accordingly"

- Pragmatic

The emphasis is not so much about making bad decisions, but about creating a culture where bad decisions can be recognised and dealt with without fear.

But it’s more than that. The emphasis is not so much about creating a culture where bad decisions can be recognised and dealt with without fear, but about creating a culture where the recognition and dealing with bad decisions (as soon as possible) is a duty. A duty of all.

If you don’t, you will never make good decisions.

Deming made this point many years ago…

In the manufacturing production lines of the USA in the 50’s and 60’s, there were red buttons placed along the line. These red buttons were emergency stop buttons that would shut down the entire line. Workers were told that if they pressed one of these buttons, they had better have a very good reason because for every second the line was stopped the company would be losing $10,000 per minute. If they could not justify pressing the button (a largely arbitrary decision by the management) they would be punished in some way, wages docked, demoted or sacked. They were actively incentivised to not press the buttons.

Deming pointed out that this narrow management view was fundamentally flawed (if you solve a problem as soon as you detect it, it will increase quality and reduce costs, whereas if you ignore a problem and are forced to deal with it later is will decrease quality and increase costs), but they did not (want to) listen. So instead Deming found someone else that would listen, namely the Toyota Motor Company in Japan.

Toyota had similar production lines with similar red buttons. However, based on Demings teachings workers were told that if they detected a problem, it was not only required of them to press the button but it was a duty as a good employee to press the button.

They were actively incentivised to press the buttons - thereby highlighting a problem as soon as it was detected so it could be solved as soon as possible.

Quality soared, costs reduced and therefore Toyota decimated the US motor industry with cars of much higher quality and much lower cost.

The only difference between the production lines of a motor company and the production lines of Enterprise Transformation is that as the line progresses the thing that people are working on is information not cars.

We need to identify as soon as possible when things are going wrong, so we can fix them as soon as possible which increases quality and reduces costs.

 

Are decision makers allowed to change decisions?

Are decision makers allowed to perform U-turns?

How do people react when decision makers change their decisions or perform U‑turns?

Are decision makers open to listening to people who expose new context or implications?

What happens to people who do expose new context or implications?

Does your Enterprise want to increase the quality of, and reduce the costs of, Transformation?

Does your Enterprises culture allow its culture to be changed?

If not, what in the current culture is preventing it?

 

◄◄◄ Previous Page          

          Next Page ►►►




 

© 2008-2016 Pragmatic EA Ltd